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632 PRAIRIE TRAVELER - BOBCAT

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Captured on film by a "camera trap," a female bobcat pauses along a creek drainage in tallgrass prairie. The bobcat is the most abundant wildcat in the United States and can adapt to diverse habitats such as woodlands, forests, swamps, deserts, agricultural lands and even suburban areas. Though relatively common in parts of the Plains, bobcats are solitary, nocturnal, and well camouflaged by the way their coats perfectly match their surroundings, so they are rarely seen by humans. Bobcats, named for their "bobbed" tails, are roughly twice the size of a house cat, and usually eat rabbits, birds, mice, squirrels, and other small game. In some areas, bobcats are still hunted for sport and fur, and although they are not considered threatened with extinction; their populations must be closely monitored. Audubon Spring Creek Prairie, Nebraska.
Copyright
MICHAEL FORSBERG / www.michaelforsberg.com
Image Size
2400x1600 / 3.1MB
Contained in galleries
Feature prints, Art Cards - boxes of 10, Great Plains, Classics, Creatures of Flight
Captured on film by a "camera trap," a female bobcat pauses along a creek drainage in tallgrass prairie. The bobcat is the most abundant wildcat in the United States and can adapt to diverse habitats such as woodlands, forests, swamps, deserts, agricultural lands and even suburban areas.  Though relatively common in parts of the Plains, bobcats are solitary, nocturnal, and well camouflaged by the way their coats perfectly match their surroundings, so they are rarely seen by humans.  Bobcats, named for their "bobbed" tails, are roughly twice the size of a house cat, and usually eat rabbits, birds, mice, squirrels, and other small game.  In some areas, bobcats are still hunted for sport and fur, and although they are not considered threatened with extinction; their populations must be closely monitored.  Audubon Spring Creek Prairie, Nebraska.